Ramblings


The little box here on WordPress is telling me it’s a month since I’ve written anything here. Where has the time gone?

Actually, I do know. I’ve been kept busy with the business side of things. It’s been interesting times as I’ve been grappling with learning more about new fangled way of doing things. It’s really interesting! It also takes up way too much time.

Do you share this WordPress Dilemma is a post I recently did for Dragon Sisters, but I’m thinking many of my followers here may find this helpful. Then again maybe you guys already knew all this about WordPress? If not, hopefully it’ll help you avoid my dilemma.

Since it does not look like I’ll be heading back to Europe in the near future, I’ve registered (at the suggestion of one of my clients) with the NT Department of Business as a consultant. This means NT businesses which are eligible for funding from the Department are able to choose from a list of consultants and I’m one of them.

Welcome to Brussels
Welcome to Brussels – not any more!

Speaking of Europe – I’m feeling very sad tonight that the vote has been for the UK to leave the European Union.  A good friend of mine wrote this after we heard the news:

 

Now comes the hard part.

Young people and others who wanted a different outcome but didn’t bother voting have to face up to the consequences of the abdication of their civic duty.

A huge task of reconciling a divided nation in which the divisions have been etched in with a diamond-tipped, power-driven electoral chisel:

Young v Old;
North v South;
Regions v Metropolitan Areas;
Rural v Urban;
Scotland and N Ireland v England and Wales;
Right v Left;
Blairites v Corbynites;
Ukippers/Brexiteers v Centre Right/One Nation Tories,
English/Welsh v EU/Non EU migrants (now all feeling unwelcome);

The hardest part of all will be in how to appease the 52% who voted Leave, when they eventually realise that absolutely nothing (not one iota of anything that matters – mark my words) will change.

Nothing will quite literally change for about 2 years, until the steps are completed to disengage.

After disengagement, immigration rates will continue at current levels (see why below).

After disengagement, identical payments to access EU markets will continue (otherwise more EU referendums will follow).

After disengagement, almost identical terms of EU trade will be negotiated (otherwise more EU referendums will follow).

EU migrants will continue to come (armed with easily acquired visas issued by overseas embassies and consulates authorized to make decisions regardless of the wishes of Brexiteers).

New UK laws passed to replace repealed EU laws will look indistinguishable from the laws they replace, to fit in with international health, employment and safety standards and international law.

The unskilled still be under pressure as large scale manufacturing and agriculture and other sources of casual and unskilled labour evolve increasingly mechanised production systems.

In only the time it takes for hardworking, aspirational second generation migrants to graduate from university (as most of them end up doing) and enter the labour market, there will be a sudden dawning realisation.

The jobs that neither we, nor our children and grandchildren (nor the children and grandchildren of first generation migrants) want to do – cooking,

work place cleaning,
building site labouring,
fruit & veg picking,
shelf stacking,
shopkeeping,
bus driving,
bus/train attendants
nursing,
nannying,
housekeeping,
janitorial duties,
street sweeping,
night security work,
delivery driving,
post office till work,
super market till work,
department store till work,
grave digging,
elderly care work,
social child care work,
mental health care work……
Many NHS staff….

………..it will eventually dawn on everyone that the only way to get these societally essential jobs done, will be to let in some more migrants.

Migrants are good for the country – regardless of whether it is UK or Australia. I’m a migrant as are so many others and we all have a good work ethic and no sense of entitlement.

Ignorance is what causes fear. Fear of what is not understood.  Education, both of the formal and travel the world kind, is the key to breaking the cycle.

The older I get, the more I appreciate all the experiences I have lived. I am thankful to have travelled extensively, to have received a great formal eduction as well through my life growing up globally. I am very fortunate to have friends from so many different nations. Our skin colours and religious beliefs have no bearing on our friendships and I am doubly pleased this has passed on to both my children.

Time for me to get off my soap box.

Goodnight all!

Michelle

2 thoughts on “Ramblings

  1. Thank you yet again for your logical take on this Brexit event which appears to have crept up on most of the EU nations
    The fallout will be of interest to all – let’s hope this historic decision by just over half of the country does not snowball and cause financial instability in a divided UK and the rest of the world.
    I expect much of the existing legislation will remain unchanged and freedom of movement across Europe can remain.

    Like

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